IF…

This one little word became a matter of contention between the parties in a lawsuit, and our reporter was at the center of the dispute.

This reporter has 40 years’ experience and has earned several NCRA credentials, but this little word got by her.  She did not hear the “if” in the witness’s answer.  She produced a rough and subsequently produced a 200-page final transcript, both of which did not contain the “if.” 

IFCounsel called and asked that she check her notes.  He just noted the page and line number he was concerned about and did not suggest what he was looking for in particular. 

Obviously the “if” was not in her notes; but after she checked the audio, she realized that indeed the “if” was missing in the answer.  This changed the meaning of the answer.  We notified opposing counsel of the error, and of course he disputed this newfound information.

After several phone calls and emails back and forth, the matter was thankfully resolved.  Our reporter obviously made an error, since the “if” was clearly heard on the audio.  There really was no dispute as to what the correct answer should have been.  Corrected transcripts and electronic files had to be resent to all involved.

This reminds me of another very experienced and qualified reporter, an RDR, who was challenged because of the word “a” in her transcript.  I forget the specifics of this example because it happened quite awhile ago. 

The point of all this is that sometimes it’s the smallest of words that can cause the biggest problems.  Think of all the words the reporter correctly took down that day, 200 pages worth.  She missed just one, but it was a very consequential one.  If it can happen to her, an RMR, CRR, it can happen to anyone. 

As students, you are acutely aware of this.  Each time you miss a word during testing, however small, it counts as an error.  In a testing situation the word “if” carries the same weight as a multisyllabic word. 

Of course we are only human and mistakes do happen.  Unfortunately in our line of work, it’s our mistakes that jump off the page, not the thousands of words we write correctly.  Unbelievably, on very rare occasions, 99.999 percent accuracy is sometimes not good enough.

To further emphasize just how critical the little words can be, please take a moment to read the article about a capital murder case that got rejected by the Supreme Court due to a discrepancy between the words “may” versus “must.”

Energize your Practice Sessions

I think most of you would agree that getting motivated to practice every day is one of the most difficult daily struggles court reporting students face.  Not only does practicing take hours out of your day, but it requires deep concentration, endurance, and, oh, yes, accuracy.

It all comes down to self-discipline.  It means resisting the temptation to shorten your practice session or skipping practice altogether.  It means a willingness to forgo things you’d rather be doing for a payoff in the end.  When you are out in the working world, self-discipline will mean working overtime to meet a deadline, missing out on social events, and working nights, weekends, and holidays to keep up with your backlog.  As one of my colleagues, Ken DiFraia, RPR, said, “If you’re not into it from the get-go, this profession is not for you.”

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I always practiced alone.  It’s the only way I could focus.  Ken, however, mentioned that he used to practice with another student, so it’s something you may want to consider.  He said there were many benefits:

  • it broke up the monotony of practicing alone
  • it allowed you to share ideas, briefs, tips, etc.
  • it provided for friendly competition for readback and speed
  • it provided much needed support from a peer

This option may not be for everyone, and it shouldn’t replace time practicing alone.  It may be worth trying a couple of times a week to see if it helps improve your skill and your spirits.  Choose a partner carefully and set up a plan for each practice session.  This will keep you on task and avoid wasted time.  It is interesting to note that Ken and his fellow student practiced together from the outset, and both passed their first 225 in the beginning of the summer session after their second year.

Sometimes shaking things up a little can prove beneficial.  It may be worth a try.  Good luck! 

Shadowing a Reporter Too Soon is Counterproductive

There are two schools of thought on this issue.  Some believe that sitting out with a working reporter at any speed is helpful.  I personally feel that you shouldn’t shadow a reporter until you have passed your 200 Q&A. 

The purpose of shadowing a court reporter is to familiarize yourself with the job, but it also should serve as a gauge of where you currently are and where you have yet to go.  If you sit out after you’ve passed your 200s, it will be a more realistic test of your abilities. You still have to pass your 225s to earn your RPR, and those extra 25 wpm are the hardest to attain!  Further, any reporter will tell you that even 225 wpm just doesn’t cut it on many days.  The gap between 180 and 225 is a big one, and sitting out at that speed would be discouraging.  Your time would be better spent practicing.

When you are ready to sit in with a reporter, you should have the mindset of putting yourself in the reporter’s place and envisioning that YOU are the reporter of record.  Learning how to swear in witnesses, mark exhibits, note stipulations, etc., is the easy part.  The hard part is creating a record.  Pretend that you are there alone.  Can you keep up?  Would you have to interrupt often?  How are you handling colloquy, the arguing, the frequent readback?  In short, would you be able to prepare a quality transcript of the entire proceedings?

Working reporters enjoy taking students out and sharing their knowledge.  This is a perfect setting to learn what you don’t in the classroom:  the reporter’s routine, tricks of the trade, use of technology.  Maybe your reporter is writing realtime for the attorneys and has provided iPads to all counsel.  You will be amazed and inspired to witness this live!  Take advantage of this special opportunity to ask your questions and get tips on what you need to do to improve.

I still remember vividly sitting out as a student.  The attorneys were always gracious, allowing me to sit in on what are always considered confidential matters.  I was grateful; they could have refused my attendance, but it was never an issue.  I was allowed a front-row seat, but I tried to be as unobtrusive and respectful as possible.  What I most remember was trying to keep up.  My fingers were still moving long after the reporter’s fingers had stopped.  I soaked it all in and took something away from every session.  Lastly, I always took a moment to thank the reporter and the attorneys for the opportunity.

Shadowing a reporter is a great experience, but it should be saved for when you are close to approaching the finish line.  At that point you’ll have more practice time under your belt and a better chance of success.  If you are not quite there yet, keep putting in as much quality practice time as you can.  Your turn to shadow a reporter will come.  I wish you all a productive learning experience out in the “real world”!

Ph.D.s Among Us

I wrote a previous blog about Gabriel Sneh, the Harvard Medical School student who rented space in our office to study for his board exam.  With exemplary grades and only four errors on his exam, he was courted by every top neurosurgery residency program in the country, and he was ecstatic on being matched with his number one choice.  His journey continues; seven more years to reach his final goal.

I was honored to have attended his graduation ceremony this past May.  It was a picture-perfect day.  The graduates were the best and the brightest in the nation.  Many received not only their medical degrees that day but advanced degrees, Ph.D.s, in different scientific disciplines.  So impressive!

The brainpower under that graduation tent was mind-blowing.  I was feeling very inferior to say the least.  But then it hit me.  No one here can do what I can do on my steno machine, not the brilliant graduates, not the esteemed faculty, not the distinguished speakers.  I sat a little straighter in my chair after this epiphany, knowing that my accomplishments had merit too, that my profession’s contributions to society are just as vital, noble, and far-reaching.

Harvard may have their Ph.D.s, but so do we.  Those reporters who hold an RDR are in the minority among us.  Perhaps we work alongside them, fellow colleagues with the highest credentials who are always called upon when the toughest of challenges present themselves.  Maybe we’ve met them at conventions and have seen them in action at the national speed contests, or maybe we’ve attended informative seminars or read articles where they have graciously shared their knowledge on technology or the high-profile daily copy cases they’ve covered while traveling the globe. We look up to them with admiration and respect.

From my vantage point I’ve seen firsthand what these exceptional professionals can do, and it never ceases to amaze me what they are capable of.  Armed with proven speed and accuracy, the latest technology, and true grit, they report the most grueling of assignments and continue learning and growing from every experience.  They not only report the “usual” – depositions, hearings, trials – but they report the seemingly impossible:  providing CART on overhead projectors in convention centers with thousands in attendance, protracted roundtable discussions between academics from around the world, confidential interviews of eminent scientists describing the most obscure minutiae of their research.  Rush delivery, realtime, rough draft?  They don’t say it’s easy, but they manage to get the job done.

All of us owe them a debt of gratitude for their ongoing pursuit of reporting excellence and their eagerness to be trailblazers in an ever-changing, technology-based profession.  They make our community stronger and our value indisputable.  May their great example inspire you as you continue your studies, and may you one day join their ranks as a top-tier court reporter.  We need you now more than ever.

ON THE RECORD / OFF THE RECORD

When you’re at a deposition and one lawyer is yelling “off the record” while opposing counsel is yelling “on the record,” what should you do?   In many cases the attorney who hired the reporter will argue that it is his deposition, that he hired us, and therefore he would determine when to go on and off the record.  The other attorney will disagree.  But no matter how loud their instructions to you are — “go off,” “stay on” — don’t let them intimidate you.

NCRA’s COPE Advisory Opinion No. 6 emphatically states that the reporter should stay on the record until both sides agree to go off.  As neutral parties, court reporters must not favor any side.  As long as one party wishes to speak, you must keep writing to preserve their position despite objection from the other side.  The same holds true regarding recording testimony:   If one party wishes to ask questions of a witness, you must keep writing.  If you are ever in doubt, keep writing.  You cannot recreate what transpired, but you can sort it all out later after you have a minute to think.  You need to safeguard the record for a judge to review at a later date.

There will be times during heated exchanges where an attorney might assume something is on the record or vice versa when the opposite is true.  As a reporter, please be aware that there could be ramifications on your end if arguments arise about whether something was on or off the record.  You do not want to be caught in the middle of a tangled mess, and you do not want to be accused of any action or inaction that could affect the outcome of a case. 

In situations like these, you have to more forcibly take matters into your own hands.  When both sides agree, you can announce “We are off the record” so as to take any guesswork out of the equation.  You can even put your statement on the record in colloquy.  This is exactly what one reporter recently did during a very contentious deposition after it was decided to take a break.  Then as the lawyers were leaving the room, one lawyer called the other lawyer a “scumbag.”  The aggrieved lawyer said, “That’s on the record!”  Unfortunately for him, however, the remark was not recorded.  The reporter’s proactive measure saved him from being put in a sticky position.  There was no room for argument.

As a reporter, do not hesitate to take charge when situations like these occur.  As an impartial guardian of the record, you must maintain its integrity.  To protect yourself, it would be a prudent practice to announce when you are going off the record and on the record, especially when the parties are not getting along.

Check out NCRA’s COPE Advisory Opinion No. 6 on this matter.  You may want to keep it handy for future reference in case an attorney questions your position on this issue.

STUDENT COURT REPORTER: SETTING ACHIEVABLE GOALS

Have you been stuck at the same speed for way too long?  Perhaps you should give some thought to setting goals.  Those who set goals have greater success than those who don’t.  The process helps you focus.  If you set attainable goals, you will experience success more often which will help you stay more motivated over the long term.  Setting goals should be a part of your daily mindset.  Implementing them will help you get to the finish line faster.

There are two goals you should be working on each day:  a speedbuilding goal and a goal for addressing your problem areas.

Regarding speedbuilding, of course your main goal, which is a constant, is to pass your next speed test, but this entails increasing your speed by a whopping 20 wpm at each level.  That is a steep hill to climb.  Instead of practicing a full five-minute take at 20 wpm over your comfortable writing speed, try breaking it down into five one-minute segments.  Make it your goal to tackle a single one-minute segment per day.  Try to write it as perfectly as possible.  Spend time on the words or sections

Hard Work

that are tripping you up.  Don’t accept drops or misstrokes.  Don’t give up.  Read back every take.

After you master the second minute, try writing the two-minute take perfectly.  Then after you master the third minute, try writing the three-minute take perfectly.  Make it your goal to write the entire five-minute take without error by the end of the week.  Practicing in one-minute increments is less daunting, and success is more readily achievable.  Correct muscle memory training comes with this kind of deliberate and consistent practice.  Your writing will flow more smoothly from your brain to your fingers, leading to less hesitation and more speed.  Be sure to get in as much practice time as possible, two hours a day at a minimum outside of class.

Improving your speed is a must, but you won’t get there if you do not address your problem areas.  When you critically examine your writing, your weaknesses will become apparent, and you can develop a game plan to improve.  If you don’t read back, you are wasting your time.

Choose a problem area that needs your immediate attention.  After that problem is solved, pick another one to work on.  Maybe you are having difficulty with numbers (dollars, cents, time, dates); maybe you can’t remember briefs; or maybe homonyms are your nemesis.  Whatever the issue, break it down into manageable parts and build from there.  Write hints on stickies and put them on your machine for easy reference.  This should be an ongoing exercise over the course of your career.  Good reporters are constantly looking for ways to fine-tune their skill so they can reduce their untranslate rate.  If you are proactive in this area, it will reap huge dividends over time.

If you set achievable goals for speedbuilding and goals for addressing problem areas, you will have a roadmap to success.  Setting goals gives purpose to your practice sessions so they will not weigh as heavily on your mind or, more importantly, your spirit.  Good luck!

 

“Your smile is your logo, your personality is your business card, how you leave others feeling after having an experience with you becomes your trademark.” ~ Jay Danzie ~

I came across this quote by Jay Danzie, and I love it because it can be applied to people doing all kinds of work in a multitude of settings. I thought it would be interesting to apply the concept to court reporters. These are my thoughts:

Your attitude is your LOGO;
Your professionalism is your BUSINESS CARD; and
Your transcripts become your TRADEMARK.

Think about it. You present at a law firm ready for work. What impression do you make? Are you pleasant and friendly, or do you grouse about your morning, the commute, the weather? Of course everyone has a bad day every now and then, but if you arrive with a bad attitude often enough, people will remember you for that. No one wants to work all day next to a sourpuss. My son’s first-grade teacher always said, “A smile goes a mile,” and it really is true! People respond positively to upbeat energy. Let this be your LOGO.

Second on the list is your professionalism. I have had the privilege of working alongside superb professionals for decades, and they all possess the same traits: a desire to excel; a commitment to learning and self-improvement; and a pledge to consistently provide a positive customer service experience. Their work ethic is exceptional. They always rise to the occasion to get the job done, even if inconvenient to them. They are our profession’s best ambassadors. Put your best professional self forward always. Let this be your BUSINESS CARD.

Lastly, what it all comes down to is your transcripts. Are they error-free? This is, after all, the ultimate goal. The transcripts, which you carefully prepare and personally certify, will be pored over months, and sometimes years, down the road. When memories have long faded, the record will stand as confirmation of what transpired. People’s lives and livelihoods depend on timely, high quality transcripts, and so does your precious reputation. Let this be your TRADEMARK.