“Your smile is your logo, your personality is your business card, how you leave others feeling after having an experience with you becomes your trademark.” ~ Jay Danzie ~

I came across this quote by Jay Danzie, and I love it because it can be applied to people doing all kinds of work in a multitude of settings. I thought it would be interesting to apply the concept to court reporters. These are my thoughts:

Your attitude is your LOGO;
Your professionalism is your BUSINESS CARD; and
Your transcripts become your TRADEMARK.

Think about it. You present at a law firm ready for work. What impression do you make? Are you pleasant and friendly, or do you grouse about your morning, the commute, the weather? Of course everyone has a bad day every now and then, but if you arrive with a bad attitude often enough, people will remember you for that. No one wants to work all day next to a sourpuss. My son’s first-grade teacher always said, “A smile goes a mile,” and it really is true! People respond positively to upbeat energy. Let this be your LOGO.

Second on the list is your professionalism. I have had the privilege of working alongside superb professionals for decades, and they all possess the same traits: a desire to excel; a commitment to learning and self-improvement; and a pledge to consistently provide a positive customer service experience. Their work ethic is exceptional. They always rise to the occasion to get the job done, even if inconvenient to them. They are our profession’s best ambassadors. Put your best professional self forward always. Let this be your BUSINESS CARD.

Lastly, what it all comes down to is your transcripts. Are they error-free? This is, after all, the ultimate goal. The transcripts, which you carefully prepare and personally certify, will be pored over months, and sometimes years, down the road. When memories have long faded, the record will stand as confirmation of what transpired. People’s lives and livelihoods depend on timely, high quality transcripts, and so does your precious reputation. Let this be your TRADEMARK.


Every now and then I come across “The Court Reporter’s Creed.”   I always find it so inspiring.   It is a reminder of how great this profession is; how indebted we are to those who came before us; and how we are carrying forth this honorable tradition in numerous settings around the country every day:  in depositions, hearings, courtrooms, classrooms, even in the United States Congress.

Few can do what we do.  Even fewer reach the level of greatness of our own profession’s heroes.  There are only approximately 30,000 court reporters in the workforce nationwide.  I’m sure the majority of the population has no idea what a court reporter does or has even seen a Stenograph machine.  In contrast, there are 1.15 million lawyers in the United States!

The importance of our role in society cannot be underestimated.  Pretrial discovery relies on sworn deposition testimony.  Criminal defendants rely on trial transcripts when their cases are appealed.  Recording our nation’s legislative business ensures transparency and honest debate.   Court reporters in all these roles are helping to uphold the rights we cherish under our Constitution.  The record never forgets; the written word holds all accountable.

Kudos to all of us who are in the trenches day after day chasing down words before they are lost forever, spoken and soon forgotten.  If you are a student, I hope reading “The Court Reporter’s Creed,” cited below, will energize you to reach your next speed goal and to one day join our proud ranks as a certified verbatim court reporter.



My profession stems from humanity’s desire and its necessity to preserve the happenings of yesterday and tomorrow.

My profession was born with the rise of civilization in Ancient Greece.

I was known as a scribe in Judea, Persia, and the Roman Empire.

I preserved the Ten Commandments for posterity and was with King Solomon while building the temple.

I was with the founding fathers of the United States when they drafted the Declaration of Independence.  My hand labored upon the scroll that set forth the Bill of Rights.

The immortal Abraham Lincoln entrusted me to record the Emancipation Proclamation.

I was commissioned to be with Roosevelt at Yalta.  I was with Eisenhower on D-Day and with MacArthur at Tokyo.

I have kept confidence reposed with me by those in high places, as well as those in lowly places.

My profession protects the truthful witness, and I am a nemesis of the perjurer.  I am a party to the administration of justice under the law and the court I serve.

I discharge my duties with devotion and honor.

Perhaps I haven’t made history, but I have preserved it through the ages.

In the past I was called a scribe.  Today I am the court reporter who sits in the courts of my country and in the United States Congress.

I am the verbatim court reporter.

50 Years of Change

April of 2017, marked the Golden Anniversary of Doris O. Wong Associates, Inc.  Court reporting has changed so much since this company opened its doors in 1967.  What has been the driving force behind all the changes?  Technology.  If I have learned anything in my almost 40 years here, it is that reporters need to embrace the changes that technology offers in order to succeed.

It’s hard to believe, but way back in the day there were pen writers.  Then manual steno machines came into being followed by electronic machines.  Since the 1960s there have been many iterations of the Stenograph machine, the latest being the Luminex, the lightest and most sophisticated machine of all.  We’ve gone from typing our own notes, to dictating our notes to typists, to computer-aided transcription and realtime translation.   We can now offer attorneys a full complement of electronic litigation support products, such as digital exhibits, synchronized transcripts to video, PDFs, interactive word indexes, and videoconferencing.  Technology has made all this possible.  Going hand in hand with all these fantastic advances are the dozens of accompanying software updates.  Who can keep up with it all?

I am here to tell you that you must try your best to keep up with every technological change that affects this profession.  It is to your benefit to do so.  Staying abreast of the technology will make your job easier.  You will be able to write and produce your transcripts with greater efficiency and confidence.  If you fail to keep up, you will be left behind.  Reporting using the latest technology will ensure you will always be employed and in high demand, especially for the most desirable of assignments.  It will enhance your value as a professional.

The very best court reporters not only keep up with the technology, they embrace it.  The leaders in our profession from all around the country push the envelope by trying newly released technology.  They eagerly await the latest advancements that will enhance their professional growth.  They are never satisfied with the status quo.  They welcome the chance to get out of their comfort zones to try something new.  Their efforts make our profession stronger because they share their experiences, and the learning curve becomes less steep for the rest of us.  Their efforts make our profession even more relevant and indispensable as attorneys cannot prepare and litigate their cases without the skill, services, and products that we can provide.

How can a reporter stay abreast of the constant technological changes?  Thankfully, there is an organization called the Society for the Technological Advancement of Reporting.  STAR provides its members with extensive training, educational resources, networking events, and the latest CAT technologies.  STAR has an annual conference with outstanding seminars and workshops given by top court reporter professionals and the actual developers who have intimate knowledge of Case Catalyst software.  This provides attendees with a unique learning opportunity.

This year Linda Fifield of Doris O. Wong Associates, Inc., is STAR’s president.  Linda, along with a core group of court reporters, has been a liaison between Stenograph and working court reporters since 1980.  They meet directly with Stenograph’s software developers and discuss what works with the software, what improvements need to made, and what their “wish lists” are.  Many of the advancements made in the court reporting industry are a direct result of this special collaboration.  The profession owes them a debt of gratitude.

STAR offers learning opportunities in addition to NCRA’s annual convention.  See for yourself how STAR can help you keep abreast of all the changes and trends in technology.  Join STAR and attend this year’s convention in Boston at the Hyatt Regency, October 12 through 14!  You won’t be disappointed.

We have come a long way in 50 years.  Nothing has stood still.  Nothing is as certain as change.  Enthusiastically accept change and reap the rewards.

“Change is hard at first, messy in the middle, and gorgeous at the end.”– Robin Sharma

Meet Connie Psaros, Editor

This is the post excerpt.

Connie Psaros, RPR, CMRSWelcome to “Student Corner”!  My name is Connie Psaros, RPR, Vice President of Doris O. Wong Associates, Inc., and I will be responsible for the content appearing here.

Who knows better than fellow court reporters what you are going through?  If you are just starting your career, you also may find this section helpful.  Feel free to contact us if we can answer any questions or address any concerns.  We want you to succeed!

Also check out our Facebook page.  It’s loaded with lots of tech tips for court reporters, court reporting trends, grammar, and much more.